Friday, July 25, 2008

CIO's in Odd Places!

I was reading this on the CIO Weblog:

http://www.cio-weblog.com/50226711/cios_in_odd_places.php

"How is this for alignment? Eye care company Bausch & Lomb has named Alan Farnsworth as CIO... and Senior Vice President of Customer Service. I've heard of CFOs doubling as CIOs. A COO doubling up on the role would raise no eyebrows here. But customer service?

Mr. Farnsworth, who has been with the company since 1998 and has most recently held the position of president of the company's Europe, Middle East, and Asia division, doesn't appear to have a lick of IT experience in his background. " -- CIO Weblog

Well, I.T. involves quite a bit of customer service. Especially in dealing with the support side of the house, this is where a customer service oriented person can fit the bill (just remember IT isn't all about computer technical support). If this guy were technical (in addition to the customer service background), I think it would be a great move. Heck all executives should have some kind of customer service background, in addition to their primary craft. I'll give examples, CFO's should have an accounting background, General Counsel = Attorney, and CIO should have a technical background.

The problem is that employees, employers, and managers do not understand technology. How many times have you been asked to fix a computer? Just because I am in I.T. doesn't mean I fix computers for a living! That is the misconception about IT, people think we are the helpdesk. Would you make a helpdesk person your CIO?

However some managers/biz owners will hand a helpdesk person a million dollar project and the helpdesk person will fail at it. So when those same managers/biz owners think of CIO, they want a proven leader. Since most folks think IT=personal computers & personal computers = support, hiring a non technical CIO doesn't matter.

The only thing IT people do is fix computers! Right? Wrong! However, let's not take the non-technical CIO's for granted. Mr. Farnsworth (for example) is a proven leader. Proven leaders understand their strengths and their short comings. If technology is not his thing, a proven CTO as his counterpart will fit the bill. Another quality of a proven leader is the ability to decipher information, adhere to recommendations from staff, and execute those recommendations!

My two cents, all executives should have a customer service background. I think it is good for business as it teaches win/win techniques. --My two cents!

Jerry

Thursday, July 24, 2008

Videogames getting minds of their own

LOS ANGELES, July 20 (AFP) Jul 20, 2008 Videogames are getting smarter with virtual enemies improvising during battles, storylines shifting based on moral choices and in-game characters sending players text messages for help.

Woah......

http://www.spacedaily.com/2006/080720070328.tvuhovui.html

Google close to acquiring Digg for '$200m'

Digg is to be purchased by Google for about $200 million, according to technology blog techcrunch.com.

This means that Digg will become part of the Google News service. Digg has become one of the most popular news websites, with users submitting stories and voting for other's submissions to appear in prominent positions on the site.

Microsoft is (rumored) interested in buying the Digg as well. Techcrunch reports that the majority of Digg's revenue comes from a three year advertising deal struck with Microsoft, which would be terminated should the company be sold to Google.

for the complete story, see:
http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/google-close-to-acquiring-digg-for-200m-875290.html

Tuesday, July 15, 2008

I got my iPhone 2.0, how about you.

Well almost. I have the iPhone 1.0 with the 2.0 firmware installed. Installation was smooth, the only hickup was re-activation. It took about a half hour to re-activate with AT&T. Seems AT&T was overwelmed with new iPhone subscriptions. Once I re-activated, I couldn't wait to check it out.

The Appstore is everything I hoped it would be. I downloaded twitter, facebook,Loopt, and a few other applications. The installation went well. Loopt is pretty cool as it uses cellphone towers to guess your location. It does a pretty good job, much better than the built in maps application. I also downloaded Where. This handy app locates starbucks, cheap gas, zip cars, concert events, resturants, and other cool places.

The Microsoft Exchange active sync works just like its Windows Mobile counterpart. Calendars, Contacts, and push mail are a breese. Unlike the Windows Mobile active sync, iPhone's active sync doesn't have a problem with my self signed ssl certs!

Pandora is an app I use on my Macbook and it works pretty much the same way on the iPhone. Music is good over the Edge, will have to ask my 3G counterparts for their experience.

So far so good with 2.0!

Thursday, July 10, 2008

Linus on Innovation

"I think that "innovation" is a four-letter word in the industry. It should never be used in polite company. It's become a PR thing to sell new versions with.
It was Edison who said "1% inspiration, 99% perspiration". That may have been true a hundred years ago. These days it's "0.01% inspiration, 99.99% perspiration", and the inspiration is the easy part. As a project manager, I have never had trouble finding people with crazy ideas. I have trouble finding people who can execute. IOW, "innovation" is way oversold. And it sure as hell shouldn't be applied to products like MS Word or Open office. " --Linus Torvalds

You know something, he is right! For those of us execs with ADHD --innovation can some times be the bling that distracts us from the misson!

Saturday, July 5, 2008

Tape Storage Gets a Makeover with New 1TB Devices

IBM and Sun Microsystems have unveiled new tape-drive products that promise to break the 1TB-capacity barrier. IBM's System Storage TS1130, which supports drive-based data encryption, will debut in September, while Sun Microsystem's StorageTek T10000B tape drive, which achieves a maximum date rate of 120MB per second, will launch this month.

The business world has long relied on tape storage as a cost-effective medium for protecting critical business data from becoming lost due to system failure, operator errors, theft and natural disasters. The good news for many enterprises is that an aging technology that has long lain dormant is once again springing back to life through the launch of new products spanning the small to very large business environments.
For example, it is significant that both IBM and Sun Microsystems have unveiled new tape-drive products this month that promise to break the one-terabyte-capacity barrier. Moreover, HP and Sony now say they will be partnering in the creation of a next-generation Digital Audio Tape (DAT) format that will deliver improved performance and capacity over current DAT tape offerings.